Conversion

American Amber Ale

ABV: 5.6%    IBU: 26 SRM: 11


An amber colored moderate-strength American craft beer 

with a caramel malty flavor. 

Designed as a low bitterness, low hop red ale 

that will attract new craft beer drinkers. 

Made to be a slightly thicker, bigger, rounder version of Yuengling Lager 


Recipe Goals:  Create a malt-forward low bitterness red ale slightly darker in color, thicker in mouthfeel and higher in alcohol content than similar commercial examples, like Yuengling.  

To do this we use an innovative process of combining lager yeast with ale fermentation temperatures. This allows us to produce a craft ale with commercial lager characteristics making it more accessible to the commercial beer consumer than most craft beer.

Background: Many people who do not try craft beer express a negative reaction to the hop’s characteristic aroma and bitterness. We reduce the hop characteristics by using them earlier in the boil with minimal late additions. In masking the hop affects and using lager yeast we are providing those who have not yet tried craft beer before a style that would make for a good first experience, a jump-off point or gateway into the culinary wonderland of craft brewed beer – Hence the name Conversion.

Tasting Notes: Low hop aroma characteristics typical of US/New World hops (spicy, floral, citrus). Moderate to high malty caramel character which helps mask the hop presentation like with their esters or fruity flavors. 

Amber in color. Moderately large off-white head with good retention. Medium to high carbonation. Slightly hazy to provide more mouthfeel than typical red ale. Presents initial malty sweetness followed by a moderate caramel flavor. Caramel sweetness and hop flavor/bitterness lingers somewhat into the finish. Medium body mouthfeel. Smooth finish. Darker, more caramelly, more body, and less bitter in balance than US Pale Ales.

History: A modern American craft beer style developed as a variation from American Pale Ales. Known as Red Ales in some regions, these beers were popularized in the Pacific Northwest. Like Irish red ales but darker with more caramel flavor, less hop aromatics, and more body. 

Ingredients: US two-row Pale Ale Malt. Crystal malts — Caramel 10L and 80L and Munich Malt. American hops, Cluster – One of the oldest US hops grown in North America and Centennial both used for bittering and aroma. White Labs American lager yeast used for its dry, clean, slightly apple effects (WLP 840).

Food Pair: The beer’s caramel notes draw out sweetness in apple and pumpkin pie, while the masked hops make the bite less sticky. Ambers pair well with most soups and deli sandwiches — the malt notes complement fresh bread, while the hops clear meat and mayo from the palate and keep lettuce crisp.

Vital Statistics:  

BJCP Amber & Brown American Ale (19A) With California Common and American Brown Ales.

For Style                  ABV: 4.5 – 6.2%     IBUs: 25 – 40          SRM: 10 – 17

Red Lion Alesmiths version.          ABV: 5.6%            IBU: 26            SRM: 11

ABV is Alcohol By Volume. Listed as a percentage volume. Average commercial beer ABV = 4.2%

IBU is International Bitterness Units. Measures bittering chemicals ranges from 0-120, but most beers are from 15-80.

SRM is Standard Reference Method. Measure of color. Scale of 0-40. From yellow, to amber/gold, to brown, to black.

Commercial Examples: Yuengling Amber Lager, Fat Tire New Belgium, Killian’s Red, Dos Equis Amber, Full Sail Amber, Kona Lavaman Red Ale, Rogue American Amber Ale, Tröegs HopBack Amber Ale

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